I wait for you and while away the days – A Villanelle

 

I wait for you, and while away the days

I shake my coat and reset time again

I sense your irritation at my gaze

 

We lost each other in that strange malaise

I feel your absence like an open chain

I wait for you, and while away the days

 

So many sad excuses and delays

There you stood unravelling your lament

I sense your irritation at my gaze

 

Tonight’s dark presence obscures your distaste

I look up to see motes of dust ascend

I wait for you, and while away the days

 

Midway on our journey I found a trace

White noise obliterates your discontent

I sense your irritation at my gaze

 

My cold skin is blemished with hope and praise

Today I will be melting in the rain

I wait for you, and while away the days

I sense your irritation at my gaze

 

 

Catherine Russ

 

 

 

 

 

 

Villanelle

A Villanelle is a verse form of French origin consisting of 19 lines arranged in five tercets and a quatrain. The first and third lines of the first tercet recur alternately at the end of each subsequent tercet and both together at the end of the quatrain.

Within the rigid structure of the Villanelle is a sense of the ancient and a wisdom as if these words might have existed in the far reaches of our time and the poet has called upon words – an incantation with repetition that keeps you in the moment.

Here are some ideas if you want to tackle a Villanelle.

 

 

 

 

And some Villanelle.

I enjoyed listening to M. Mark discussion on Elizabeth Bishop and the ‘typography of silence’ before she reads ‘One Art.

 

 

How to Read a Poem

Out loud of course, but how do poets read their work well I wonder?

An open mic session at a pub with local poets sounds fun… it also has me thinking about how to read a poem.

So I collected some readings.

First up – Billy Collins answering a question on reading poetry aloud…

 

 

 

 

‘Some Days’ by Billy Collins…

 

 

 

 

Charles Simic influenced the way Billy Collins reads poetry…

 

 

 

 

Sylvia Path…

 

 

 

 

Philip Larkin…

 

 

 

 

and Alice Oswald.

 

 

A Paisley Snail…

Capture

ART – “lies half-way between scientific knowledge and mythical or magical thought. It is common knowledge that the artist is both something of a scientist and of a ‘bricoleur’.”

Claude Levi Strauss

Bricolage, assemblage, collage and found – some of my favourite words that form part of my approach to visual arts. Bricolage is the construction or creation of a new work using existing materials and text. French social anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss (1908-2009) used bricolage to describe the way an artist “shapes the beautiful and useful out of the dump heap of human life.”

I spent a large part of 2016 experimenting with found objects, in particular vacuum cleaners and household dust, in an attempt to understand one of my ‘default settings’ and the magic of the ‘everyday’. Dust Devil, an installation, draws on the ‘dump of human life’. I could be both scientist and ‘bricoleur’.

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Catherine Russ. “Dust Devil.” 2016. Installation

This year I am excited to discover and experiment with …

 

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The words I found are part of a landmark legal case decided in 1932 by the House of Lords. Donoghue v Stevenson established the legal principle that a duty of care is owed to your neighbour (circumstances dependent)  and where that duty is breached the offending party is liable for the foreseeable losses that follow from the breach of duty.

A Paisley Snail

At Wellmeadow Café in a town called Paisley,

a friend orders Mrs Donoghue a drink.

Ice cream with ginger beer,

from a bottle made of dark opaque glass.

A friend orders Mrs Donoghue a drink.

Mr Minchella, the café owner, pours ginger beer into a tumbler of ice cream,

from a bottle made of dark opaque glass.

Mrs Donoghue enjoys her drink.

Mr Minchella, the café owner, pours ginger beer into a tumbler of ice cream.

Her friend pours more ginger beer onto the ice cream,

Mrs Donoghue enjoys her drink.

But in the dark opaque bottle lies a decomposing snail.

Her friend pours more ginger beer onto the ice cream.

A noxious condition – snail tainted ginger beer.

But from the dark opaque bottle falls a decomposing snail.

Mrs Donoghue suffers shock and illness.

A noxious condition – snail tainted ginger beer.

Lord Atkin asks ‘Who is my neighbour?’

Mrs Donoghue suffers shock and illness.

In law you must not injure your neighbour.

Lord Atkin asks ‘Who is my neighbour?’

Ice cream with ginger beer –

in law you must not injure your neighbour,

at Wellmeadow Café in a town called Paisley.

Catherine Russ

Retuna Mall

The Retuna mall in Sweden sells only repaired or upcycled products.

http://www.goodnewsnetwork.org/sweden-opens-worlds-first-mall-repaired-recycled-goods/