How to Read a Poem

Out loud of course, but how do poets read their work well I wonder?

An open mic session at a pub with local poets sounds fun… it also has me thinking about how to read a poem.

So I collected some readings.

First up – Billy Collins answering a question on reading poetry aloud…

 

 

 

 

‘Some Days’ by Billy Collins…

 

 

 

 

Charles Simic influenced the way Billy Collins reads poetry…

 

 

 

 

Sylvia Path…

 

 

 

 

Philip Larkin…

 

 

 

 

and Alice Oswald.

 

 

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The Hero’s Journey

Joseph Campbell, born in 1904 in New York paid particular attention to the hero’s journey. He made observations on their journey in his books the Hero with a Thousand Faces, The Power of Myth and The Inner Reaches of Outer Space.

George Lucas responded to reading Campbell’s work with Star Wars. I’ll never forget seeing the first Star Wars movie with my dad and sisters as a nine year old.

I’ve gathered up some video resource on the HERO’S JOURNEY beginning with the allure of Greek tragedies

 

 

 

 

…and then consider – What makes a hero?

 

 

 

 

And have a look at Buzz and Woody’s hero’s journey.

 

 

Reading Like a Writer – Lydia Davis

Lydia Davis, an American, was born on 15 July 1947. Davis describes herself as ‘both fiction writer and translator. I’ve been both for as long as I can remember, and they complement each other nicely.’[1]

Davis’ shortest stories can be one or two lines. She writes about the mundane and banal moments of human existence. In 2013 Davis won the Man Booker Prize and Sir Christopher Ricks, chairman of the judges, said:

‘her writings fling their lithe arms wide to embrace many a kind. Just how to categorise them? They have been called stories but could equally be miniatures, anecdotes, essays, jokes, parables, fables, texts, aphorisms or even apophthegms, prayers or simply observations.’[2]

The clip below is titled: Advice to the Young ignore the ‘young’ part as Davis’ advice is for anyone who wants to read like a writer and it’s great!

 

 

 

 

And here she is discussing the blank page. I was intrigued by the idea of collecting blank pages belonging to writers – and Davis’ response – fabulous!

 

 

 

 

On Samuel Beckett…

 

 

 

 

her attention to detail is fascinating…

 

 

 

 

and you see this in her meditation on a small herd of cows.

 

 

 

 

Finally a link that follows the development of one of her short stories.

 

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2014/07/lydia-daviss-very-short-stories/372286/

 

 

 

[1] Translator Profile: Lydia Davis – Asymptote Blog. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.asymptotejournal.com/blog/2016/08/24/translator-profile-lydia-davis/

[2] Lydia Davis wins the Man Booker International Prize 2013 | The Man Booker Prizes. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://themanbookerprize.com/news/2013/05/22/lydia-davis-wins-man-booker-international-prize-2013

A Paisley Snail…

Capture

ART – “lies half-way between scientific knowledge and mythical or magical thought. It is common knowledge that the artist is both something of a scientist and of a ‘bricoleur’.”

Claude Levi Strauss

Bricolage, assemblage, collage and found – some of my favourite words that form part of my approach to visual arts. Bricolage is the construction or creation of a new work using existing materials and text. French social anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss (1908-2009) used bricolage to describe the way an artist “shapes the beautiful and useful out of the dump heap of human life.”

I spent a large part of 2016 experimenting with found objects, in particular vacuum cleaners and household dust, in an attempt to understand one of my ‘default settings’ and the magic of the ‘everyday’. Dust Devil, an installation, draws on the ‘dump of human life’. I could be both scientist and ‘bricoleur’.

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Catherine Russ. “Dust Devil.” 2016. Installation

This year I am excited to discover and experiment with …

 

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The words I found are part of a landmark legal case decided in 1932 by the House of Lords. Donoghue v Stevenson established the legal principle that a duty of care is owed to your neighbour (circumstances dependent)  and where that duty is breached the offending party is liable for the foreseeable losses that follow from the breach of duty.

A Paisley Snail

At Wellmeadow Café in a town called Paisley,

a friend orders Mrs Donoghue a drink.

Ice cream with ginger beer,

from a bottle made of dark opaque glass.

A friend orders Mrs Donoghue a drink.

Mr Minchella, the café owner, pours ginger beer into a tumbler of ice cream,

from a bottle made of dark opaque glass.

Mrs Donoghue enjoys her drink.

Mr Minchella, the café owner, pours ginger beer into a tumbler of ice cream.

Her friend pours more ginger beer onto the ice cream,

Mrs Donoghue enjoys her drink.

But in the dark opaque bottle lies a decomposing snail.

Her friend pours more ginger beer onto the ice cream.

A noxious condition – snail tainted ginger beer.

But from the dark opaque bottle falls a decomposing snail.

Mrs Donoghue suffers shock and illness.

A noxious condition – snail tainted ginger beer.

Lord Atkin asks ‘Who is my neighbour?’

Mrs Donoghue suffers shock and illness.

In law you must not injure your neighbour.

Lord Atkin asks ‘Who is my neighbour?’

Ice cream with ginger beer –

in law you must not injure your neighbour,

at Wellmeadow Café in a town called Paisley.

Catherine Russ

Retuna Mall

The Retuna mall in Sweden sells only repaired or upcycled products.

http://www.goodnewsnetwork.org/sweden-opens-worlds-first-mall-repaired-recycled-goods/